For about 20 years, Ray Keating wrote a weekly column - a short time with the New York City Tribune, more than 11 years with Newsday, another seven years with Long Island Business News, plus another year-and-a-half with RealClearMarkets.com. As an economist, Keating also pens an assortment of analyses each week. With the Keating Files, he decided to expand his efforts with regular commentary touching on a broad range of issues, written by himself and an assortment of talented contributors and columnists. So, here goes...

Friday, June 11, 2021

Market Failure and Government Failure

 


Free Enterprise in Three Minutes with Ray Keating – Episode #107: Market Failure and Government Failure – Ray explains what “market failure” is, while also warning about “government failure.”

Saturday, June 5, 2021

A Bite of Business History: The Egg McMuffin Turns 45

 by Chris Lucas

Guest Column

The Keating Files – June 5, 2021

 

This month marks the 45th anniversary of the national rollout of the sandwich that saved McDonald’s and changed fast food forever ... The Egg McMuffin.

 

Before 1976, it was almost unheard of in America to have breakfast anywhere but in your own kitchen. Cereal was the most popular choice. If you ran late and had to leave without sitting down to eat, you were pretty much out of luck.

 

In 1972, a McDonald’s franchisee in California came up with the idea of an open faced breakfast meal - his version of Eggs Benedict. McDonald’s owner Ray Kroc loved the taste, but wanted it made into a sandwich you could eat quickly and easily with one hand only. 



The company spent another four years getting it just right before introducing it across America. The Egg McMuffin (so named by Patty Turner) was a smash-hit classic right away. 

 

McDonald’s sales had been lagging at that point, as more and more fast food chains opened up. They all generally didn’t start serving food until 11AM. The Egg McMuffin gave McDonalds a three hour jump start on the day. Competitors tried to match that.

 

Burger King - the first to copy McDonalds, with their Croissanwich - didn’t start serving breakfast until 1983, and everyone else followed them.

 

Today, breakfast sales account for more than 50% of fast food revenue. It’s estimated that one out of every four people eat a fast food breakfast at least once a week.

 

Though fast food is often thought of as unhealthy or overly processed, the Egg McMuffin is not so bad. 

 

It’s made with a real egg that is poached and not fried. It has a small circle of Canadian bacon, a single slice of American cheese, and real butter. Together, this totals to 290 calories, 12 grams of fat with about six of those grams coming from saturated fat, 17 grams of protein (34 percent), and 29 grams of carbs (10 percent.) It’s also the only egg item on McDonald’s menu made with freshly cracked eggs from a shell, not processed.

 

McDonald’s, now one of the biggest mass purchasers of eggs in the world, finally made breakfast meals an all-day thing in 2015. As soon as they did, their sales doubled.

 

Amazing how a change of cultural habits can come from one simple idea.

 

__________

 

Chris Lucas is an actor, writer, something of a cultural historian, and the author of Top Disney: 100 Top Ten Lists of the Best of Disney, from the Man to the Mouse and Beyond.

 

On the PRESS CLUB C Podcast, enjoy Ray’s recent discussion with Chris Lucas about his career as an actor, author and Disney expert. Tune in right here!

Friday, May 28, 2021

“What’s Lost?” is the Latest Pastor Stephen Grant Thriller from Award-Winning Novelist Ray Keating

 Gripping Tale Told in Pastor Grant’s Own Words

 

What’s Lost? A Pastor Stephen Grant Short Story is an edge of-your-seat page-turner by Ray Keating that is torn from the pages of Grant’s own journal.



Pastor Stephen Grant tells a riveting mystery involving deception, betrayal, sacrifice and friendship, along with plenty of action and questions about what we truly can know about others. Grant takes us on a personal journey across decades and around the world, from Long Island to Vietnam.

 

This is the second Pastor Stephen Grant thriller by Ray Keating told from Grant’s own viewpoint, unfolding each day in the pages of his journal.

 

In a 4-star review of What’s Lost?Self-Publishing Review said, “The Pastor Stephen Grant universe grows a bit wider and more fascinating with Ray Keating's latest short story release. This gripping tale of deception, retribution, and redemption is filled with espionage, action, and a good deal of enticing mystery. Keating's original twists and singular protagonist result in another solid ride.”

 

For good measure, Kirkus Reviews has called Ray Keating’s Pastor Stephen Grant “an engaging and multifaceted character” and “a consistently entertaining hero.” 

 

Ray Keating said, “Like Past LivesWhat’s Lost? is an adventure written from a first-person point of view. Grant tells the story through his journal entries. And while this is a ‘short story,’ it’s packed with action, mystery and revelations about relationships.” 

 

What’s Lost? comes after the recent publication of Past Lives: A Pastor Stephen Grant Short Storyand Vatican Shadows: A Pastor Stephen Grant Novel, which have earned widespread praise. 

 

Paperbacks and the Kindle edition of What’s Lost? A Pastor Stephen Grant Short Story are at Amazon via https://www.amazon.com/dp/B094GQN6PG and signed books are at https://raykeatingonline.com/products/whatslost.

 

About Keating and his Pastor Stephen Grant thrillers and mysteries, Kirkus Reviews simply says “exhilarating.” Lutheran Book Review says, “I miss Tom Clancy. Keating fills that void for me.” The retired host of KFUO radio’s BookTalk declares, “Ray Keating is a great novelist.” David Keene of The Washington Times calls these novels “great reads.”  And another reviewer observes, “How I'd love to see Pastor Grant on Netflix!”

 

Keating’s previous Pastor Stephen Grant thrillers/mysteries – Past Lives (2021), Vatican Shadows(2020), The Traitor (2019), Deep Rough (2019), Shifting Sands (2018), Heroes and Villains (2018), Reagan Country (2018), Lionhearts (2017), Wine Into Water (2016), Murderer’s Row (2015), The River (2014), An Advent For Religious Liberty (2012), Root of All Evil? (Second Edition 2020)andWarrior Monk (Second Edition 2019) – have received widespread praise from all kinds of readers. 

 

Review copies, and author interviews and appearances are available upon request. 

 

Contact: Ray Keating

E-mail: raykeating@keatingreports.com

Facebook: www.facebook.com/PastorStephenGrantNovels

Twitter: @KeatingNovels

PastorStephenGrant.com

RayKeatingOnline.com

Monday, May 24, 2021

How Did Phil Mickelson Make Golf History at 50?

 by Ray Keating

The Keating Files – May 24, 2021

 

A love of golf was a gift instilled in me at a young age by my grandfather. I grew to not only appreciate golf being a heavily mental game that, of course, requires precise physical execution, but also to become a fan of the game, including its rich history.

 

There’s that word: history. The sports world witnessed history on Sunday, May 23, when Phil Mickelson became the oldest golfer to win one of golf’s four majors – the PGA Championship. For the first time since 1986, my heart wasn’t broken while watching one of the greats try to reclaim glory at a major.



Previously, the oldest to win a major tournament was Julius Boros, who took the PGA Championship in 1968 at the age of 48, beating out Arnold Palmer. Next in the age line came Old Tom Morris, winner of the British Open in 1867, and Jack Nicklaus taking the Masters in 1986 – each man was 46 years old. As for the U.S. Open, Hale Irwin won the 1990 U.S. Open at 45.

 

I’m in no way dismissing Irwin’s great achievement, but for me and countless others, that Nicklaus unexpected win at the Masters by the greatest golfer of all time was incredible and unforgettable. But thirty-five years since Nicklaus’ last victory at the Masters is a long time to wait for another truly great achievement of beating the field and Father Time at a major by a special player. 

 

Indeed, there have been some disappointments along the way. It’s not unusual to see a great player past his prime, perhaps in his late forties or early fifties, to pop up early on the leaderboard of a major, only to inevitably fade. 

 

But there have been some serious runs, too. People might forget that Nicklaus, at the age of 58, was in contention in the final round at the 1998 Masters and finished sixth. And perhaps the most tragic example was Tom Watson at the age of 59 falling short at the very end of the 2009 British Open at Turnberry in his attempt to win a ninth major.

 

But there was no disappointment at the final round of the 2021 PGA Championship at the Ocean Course on Kiawah Island. After a rough start during the first six holes in the first round on Thursday, Mickelson became the best player on the course for the remainder of the tournament. 

 

Mickelson’s victory at 50 years and 11 months old – to win his sixth major – was a remarkable accomplishment. And it seemed like the entire golf world and beyond was rooting him on to victory, as illustrated by the gallery engulfing Mickelson, as well as his playing partner Brooks Koepka, in the 18th fairway of the final round.

 

Golf is one of those sports that one would assume older players, if they stayed in good shape including by taking advantage of latest thinking and tools on fitness, could remain competitive into their late forties and into their fifties. I’ve often thought that. And it is true – to an extent. After all, younger players can take advantage of the same fitness advantages. So, while the 50 year old can be a more fit and better golfer than 50 years ago, the same goes for the 25 year old. Therefore, it’s unclear how much the improvements in fitness for those in their late forties and fifties have meant in terms of gaining competitive ground on younger players. Given that Boros’ win came 53 years ago, Nicklaus’ 35 years past, Irwin’s 31 years ago, and Morris’, well, 154 year earlier, one had to wonder.

 

Then along comes Phil Mickelson in May 2021. Mickelson in recent years made big changes in his fitness, and at the PGA, here was Phil at nearly 51 often hitting longer drives than men a quarter century younger. But there’s more at play here than the physical. 

 

As I said earlier, golf is a heavily mental game. And with age and experience come, hopefully, greater insight and wisdom. One could see that with Mickelson throughout the tournament. This was not the full swashbuckling Phil, who both won and lost majors due to his derring-do, and would, at his worst moments, take unnecessarily risky shots. The 2021 PGA Championship Mickelson was the smartest guy in the field. He brought all he had learned during his great career with him to the course each of the four days. And it was clear that he stayed mentally focused, including using that famed Mickelson imagination.



In the past, when a great older player would falter or fade in a tournament, I often got the feeling that it was perhaps even more about a loss of mental focus than the physical challenges. That always struck me as odd, again, given the benefits gained from experience. But as most of us can attest to no matter our age, the physical and mental are not separate spheres, but instead are intimately intertwined. If you’re weary or tired, you’re simply not going to be as mentally sharp as you otherwise would be.

 

Mickelson’s achievement at the PGA Championship turns out to be a lesson for his fellow golfers, as well as the rest of us in our own endeavors. It’s not one or the other – the mental or the physical – but instead it’s about both. 

 

Phil Mickelson improved his physical well-being, and worked to enhance his mental focus. Combine those actions with his experience, creativity and talent, and you get the man who is now the oldest player in golf history to win a major. For older golfers still looking to win a major, for example, it’s about work being done on both the physical and mental fronts, and how those work together.

 

Dare I ask: Could Phil Mickelson still win the one major that has eluded him, having come in second a record six times at the U.S. Open? That’s a huge ask, even considering all we have considered here, but as opposed to just a few days ago, it’s now something that lies within the realm of possibilities. 

 

But let’s not reduce in any way this monumental achievement. Phil Mickelson ended the disappointment for fans like me, winning his sixth major at 50 years old. That’s history, Phil. Thanks!

 

_________

 

Ray Keating is a columnist, novelist, economist, podcaster and entrepreneur.  Keating has two new books out. Vatican Shadows: A Pastor Stephen Grant Novel is the 13ththriller/mystery in the Pastor Stephen Grant series. Get the paperback or Kindle edition at Amazon, or signed books at www.raykeatingonline.comPast Lives: A Pastor Stephen Grant Short Story is the 14th book in the series. Get the paperback or Kindle edition at Amazon, or signed book at www.raykeatingonline.comAnd pre-order the 15th book in the series What’s Lost? A Pastor Stephen Grant Short Story.

 

The views expressed here are his own – after all, no one else should be held responsible for this stuff, right?

 

You also can order his book Behind Enemy Lines: Conservative Communiques from Left-Wing New York  from Amazon or signed books  at RayKeatingOnline.com. His other recent nonfiction book is Free Trade Rocks! 10 Points on International Trade Everyone Should Know

 

One of the best ways to enjoy Ray Keating’s Pastor Stephen Grant thrillers and mysteries is to join the Pastor Stephen Grant Fellowship! For the BEST VALUE, consider the Book of the Month Club.  Check it all out at https://www.patreon.com/pastorstephengrantfellowship

 

Also, check out Ray’s podcasts – the Daily Dose of DisneyFree Enterprise in Three Minutes, and the PRESS CLUB C Podcast.

 

Check out Ray Keating’s Disney news and entertainment site at www.DisneyBizJournal.com.




Wednesday, May 12, 2021

Liz Cheney and the Decline of the Republican Party

 by Ray Keating

The Keating Files – May 12, 2021

 

After several years of experiencing sad political days, this conservative was hit hard once more today – May 12, 2021 – when Republicans in the U.S. House of Representatives voted to oust U.S. Rep. Liz Cheney (R-WY) from her leadership position. It wasn’t a surprise, but it was nonetheless depressing.



This inexcusable action served as glaring evidence that the party of Reagan has been lost to the party of Trump. And this despite the fact that Donald Trump lost the White House, the Senate and the House while in office (oh yes, and was impeached … twice). Indeed, you have to go back to Herbert Hoover for the last time a Republican president managed such incompetence at the ballot box.

 

While Trump is all about an incoherent, victim-based, enemies-are-everywhere, ends-justify-the-means populism, Liz Cheney ranks as a solid, principled conservative with integrity in the Reagan tradition. As a result, she naturally spoke out against President Trump’s false claims that the 2020 election was stolen, and against his role in stoking the violence of January 6 when his supporters invaded the Capitol. Cheney spoke the truth at the time, and has continued to do so.

 

But that apparently was too much for House Republicans – many of whom actually took Trump to task for his role on January 6, but now want to forget about that, and pander to Trump and his supporters in their party.

 

So, Liz Cheney had to go. 

 

But at the same time, conspiracy kook Marjorie Taylor Greene, for example, seems to suffer in no way with her Republican colleagues. As a reminder, Rep. Greene, as The Washington Post summed up, “Greene has made comments on social media suggesting that some mass shootings were staged by supporters of gun control, that the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks were orchestrated by government entities and that a Jewish cabal had sparked a deadly California wildfire with a laser beam directed from space. As recently as late last year, she was an adherent of the false claims of the QAnon ideology. She has renounced some of her most outlandish claims.” But that’s all okay, apparently, because Greene is a big Trump supporter.

 

Meanwhile, consider points from Cheney’s speech in the House last night (May 11):

 

     “Three men – an immigrant who escaped Castro’s totalitarian regime; a young man who grew up behind the iron curtain and became his country’s minister of defense; and a dissident who spent years in the Soviet gulag have all told me it was the miracle of America captured in the words of President Ronald Reagan that inspired them to seek freedom.

     “I have seen the power of faith and freedom. I listened to Pope John Paul II speak to thousands in Nairobi in 1985, and 19 years later I watched that same pope take my father’s hand, look in his eyes, and say, ‘God Bless America.’

     “God has blessed America, but our freedom only survives if we protect it, if we honor our oath, taken before God in this chamber, to support and defend the Constitution, if we recognize threats to freedom when they arise. 

     “Today we face a threat America has never seen before. A former president, who provoked a violent attack on this Capitol in an effort to steal the election, has resumed his aggressive effort to convince Americans that the election was stolen from him. He risks inciting further violence. 

     “Millions of Americans have been misled by the former President. They have heard only his words, but not the truth, as he continues to undermine our democratic process, sowing seeds of doubt about whether democracy really works at all…

     “As the party of Reagan, Republicans championed democracy, won the Cold War, and defeated the Soviet Communists. As we speak, America is on the cusp of another Cold War – this time with communist China. Attacks against our democratic process and the rule of law empower our adversaries and feed Communist propaganda that American democracy is a failure. We must speak the truth. Our election was not stolen, and America has not failed.”

 

After being ousted from her leadership position, Cheney told reporters, “The nation needs a strong Republican Party. The nation needs a party that is based on fundamental principles of conservatism. And I am committed and dedicated to ensuring that that’s how this party goes forward. And I plan to lead the fight to do that.”

 

And during the GOP House conference, according to Politico, Cheney declared, “If you want leaders who will enable and spread his destructive lies, I’m not your person, you have plenty of others to choose from. That will be their legacy. But I promise you this, after today, I will be leading the fight to restore our party and our nation to conservative principles, to defeating socialism, to defending our republic, to making the GOP worthy again of being the party of Lincoln.”

 

I agree wholeheartedly with Liz Cheney, and I hope and pray for the sake of the nation that she plays a key role in successfully winning the Republican Party back to sanity and true conservatism. It’s clear that this will be no easy task – indeed, far from it.

 

_________

 

Ray Keating is a columnist, novelist, economist, podcaster and entrepreneur.  Keating has two new books out. Vatican Shadows: A Pastor Stephen Grant Novel is the 13ththriller/mystery in the Pastor Stephen Grant series. Get the paperback or Kindle edition at Amazon, or signed books at www.raykeatingonline.comPast Lives: A Pastor Stephen Grant Short Story is the 14th book in the series. Get the paperback or Kindle edition at Amazon, or signed book at www.raykeatingonline.comAnd pre-order the 15th book in the series What’s Lost? A Pastor Stephen Grant Short Story.

 

The views expressed here are his own – after all, no one else should be held responsible for this stuff, right?

 

You also can order his book Behind Enemy Lines: Conservative Communiques from Left-Wing New York  from Amazon or signed books  at RayKeatingOnline.com. His other recent nonfiction book is Free Trade Rocks! 10 Points on International Trade Everyone Should Know

 

One of the best ways to enjoy Ray Keating’s Pastor Stephen Grant thrillers and mysteries is to join the Pastor Stephen Grant Fellowship! For the BEST VALUE, consider the Book of the Month Club.  Check it all out at https://www.patreon.com/pastorstephengrantfellowship

 

Also, check out Ray’s podcasts – the Daily Dose of DisneyFree Enterprise in Three Minutes, and the PRESS CLUB C Podcast.

 

Check out Ray Keating’s Disney news and entertainment site at www.DisneyBizJournal.com.

Friday, April 23, 2021

An Actor’s Take on Shakespeare’s Prolific and Influential Works

 by Chris Lucas

Guest Column

The Keating Files – April 23, 2021

 

Today is the 405th anniversary of the death of William Shakespeare, arguably THE greatest writer in the history of the English language.

 

How great?

 

Shakespeare was so influential that his works introduced hundreds of every day words and phrases into our lives. His imaginary slang and expressions became accepted as common.



His prolific work has also been adapted and copied for centuries. Shakespeare’s name appears as co-writer or “story by” in over 2,000 films and TV shows. 

 

There’s not a person alive who isn’t in some way familiar with one of Shakespeare’s plots, invented words, unique phrases or characters.

 

As both a writer and an actor, I owe a great debt to The Bard of Avon.

 

When I was six my grandmother gave me a children’s adaptation of some of his great stories, and she continued to give me Shakespeare books each birthday, culminating in his full folio bound in leather when I was 16. 

 

I’d spend hours in my room reading and performing those scenes and sonnets to nobody in particular, which improved my vocabulary, diction and timing. 

 

Professionally, I’ve only done two of his shows on stage. I played Touchstone in “As You Like It” and also King Lear’s Fool (a part I was born to play.) My goal was Hamlet one day, but I never did get to that, and now my age and waist line puts me more in the Falstaffian range. 

 

On my bucket list still is performing Shakespeare in Central Park and being in the groundlings pit watching one of his classics performed live at the Globe Theater in England. 

 

Thank you, Master Shakespeare, for inspiring generations with the reminder that “To be a well favored person is a gift of fortune, but to write and read is a gift of nature.”

 

__________

 

Chris Lucas is an actor, writer, something of a cultural historian, and the author ofTop Disney: 100 Top Ten Lists of the Best of Disney, from the Man to the Mouse and Beyond.

 

On the PRESS CLUB C Podcast, enjoy Ray’s discussion with Chris Lucas about his career as an actor, author and Disney expert. Tune in right here!

Thursday, April 22, 2021

Presidents and Their Hobbies

 by Chris Lucas

Guest Column

The Keating Files – April 22, 2021

 

Former President George W. Bush has published a book of portraits he created of immigrants to the United States, called Out of Many, One: Portraits of America's Immigrants.

 

It’s Bush’s second book of such portraits. Many are surprised to see his aptitude for painting, which - along with long distance running - is his hobby.

 


Presidents are just like everyone else and enjoy a variety of unique hobbies to blow off steam from the pressures of the job. Many of the presidents have even had the White House and Camp David modified to allow them easy access to pursuing their hobbies during downtime. 

 

President Biden, whose father ran an automobile dealership when he was a boy, is an avid vintage car enthusiast and collector. 

 

Biden still has the first car he ever owned, a 1967 green Chevy Corvette, which sits in his garage at his home in Delaware. When he’s there, President Biden can often be found either working on the 1967 car or driving it around (though his route is more limited now.) 

 

The four presidents whose faces are on Mount Rushmore also had hobbies that distinguished them.

 

George Washington was a skilled ballroom dancer.

 

Thomas Jefferson collected rare French wines.

 

Abraham Lincoln wrestled to relax, and out of hundreds of recorded bouts only lost one time.

 

And Teddy Roosevelt was an avid boxer who held matches at the White House. In one of those fights, the president’s opponent in the ring - a professional pugilist - connected with Roosevelt’s head and detached his retina, permanently blinding him in one eye. 

 

Teddy’s cousin, Franklin D. Roosevelt, chose a tamer White House hobby. FDR was a philatelist, with an impressive stamp collection that he would go over every night when time permitted. He also consulted with his Postmaster General on the designs for new stamps during his 13 years as president. 

 

Here are some of the main hobbies of the presidents since FDR:

 

Harry Truman - piano playing 

Dwight Eisenhower - golfing, painting

John F. Kennedy - sailing, golfing

Lyndon B. Johnson - horseback riding

Richard Nixon - bowling, piano playing 

Gerald R. Ford - tennis, golfing

Jimmy Carter - fishing

Ronald Reagan - horseback riding

George H. W. Bush - horseback riding, playing horseshoes

Bill Clinton - saxophone playing, crossword puzzles

George W. Bush - running, painting

Barack Obama - comic book collecting, golfing 

Donald Trump – golfing

 

What are your favorite hobbies?

 

__________

 

Chris Lucas is a writer, something of a cultural historian, actor, and the author of Top Disney: 100 Top Ten Lists of the Best of Disney, from the Man to the Mouse and Beyond.

 

On the PRESS CLUB C Podcast, enjoy Ray’s recent discussion with Chris Lucas about his career as an actor, author and Disney expert. Tune in right here!

 

Saturday, April 17, 2021

Disney on How NOT To Do Diversity

 by Ray Keating

The Keating Files – April 17, 2021

(This column originally ran at DisneyBizJournal.com.)

 

The statement kind of hits like a cold bucket of water over the head: “I will tell you for the first time we received some incredibly well-written scripts that did not satisfy our standards in terms of inclusion, and we passed on them.”

 

As noted by the Hollywood Reporter, Walt Disney Television chairman of entertainment Dana Walden made this declaration recently during a panel discussion. And it’s the direct result of a set of inclusion standards – i.e., actual percentage breakdowns of “groups” populating on-screen presentation, creative teams and behind the scenes – set up in the fall 2020 by ABC/Disney.

 


Before pondering possible implications, and given the political powder-keg that such declarations can ignite, there are a few quick things that need saying. First, there are those on the Right who mistakenly believe that racism and prejudice simply don’t exist. Second, many on the Left see racism and prejudice everywhere, and believe that racism is as bad as it has ever been in this country. Disagreements in this area often rank as the most strident and ugly in our public life, and feed an increasing tribalism – that is, I have my group, you have yours, and we are not together in any true sense. So much for the U.S. motto of E Pluribus Unum. The reality is that racism and prejudice very much exist, much work still needs to be done in healing our divisions, but also so very much already has been accomplished. Anyone who cannot see all of this is ignoring history for the sake of playing divisive politics.

 

As for actions being taken, private companies are free to choose to implement whatever policies they see fit to expand diversity. At the same time, that doesn’t mean that such policies should not be examined and subject to criticism.

 

Diversity as an objective for a business is not new and can be beneficial, such as by bringing various viewpoints and perspectives to decision-making. When done thoughtfully and constructively, it can send positive messages beyond the firm as well. 

 

At its best, corporate efforts to improve diversity and inclusion mean opening more doors, and expanding the number of chairs at the table. The point is that business is not a zero-sum game. The right decisions mean growth and expanding opportunities, hopefully, for all.

 

But that is not the message behind Walden’s comment. That drips of zero-sum, us-vs.-them thinking, with diversity and inclusion efforts resulting in the exclusion of certain people. How tragically ironic.

 

It also clearly points to politics trumping quality. Disney is a storytelling company in the storytelling business, and that is perhaps why this statement, while not surprising in parts of the business world today, is shocking and dismaying. Disney should be welcoming to all who tell good stories. That would seem to be one of the tenets upon which Walt Disney built the company. It’s not, or should not be, a case of either diversity or quality. Why not both?

 

Indeed, creators should be most distressed by such declarations, along with formulas as to who effectively can and cannot create with the company. As a storyteller myself (a novelist), I create the best material I can, and work with others to bring those stories to the public. My hope is the same for other creators. 

 

What’s nice is that technology makes statements like this from Walden, and percentage breakdowns on the “groups” that Disney will and will not work with, largely irrelevant. Technology has empowered writers and filmmakers like never before. Creators can create, and gain direct access to consumers like never before. That’s exciting for all creators, including those who have suffered due to racism and prejudice, and those who fail to align with leftist dictates from certain companies. Perhaps there is an opportunity for creators to truly unite.

 

 

_________

 

Ray Keating is a columnist, novelist, economist, podcaster and entrepreneur.  Keating has two new books out. Vatican Shadows: A Pastor Stephen Grant Novel is the 13ththriller/mystery in the Pastor Stephen Grant series. Get the paperback or Kindle edition at Amazon, or signed books at www.raykeatingonline.comPast Lives: A Pastor Stephen Grant Short Story is the 14th book in the series. Get the paperback or Kindle edition at Amazon, or signed book at www.raykeatingonline.comAnd pre-order the 15th book in the series What’s Lost? A Pastor Stephen Grant Short Story.

 

The views expressed here are his own – after all, no one else should be held responsible for this stuff, right?

 

You also can order his book Behind Enemy Lines: Conservative Communiques from Left-Wing New York  from Amazon or signed books  at RayKeatingOnline.com. His other recent nonfiction book is Free Trade Rocks! 10 Points on International Trade Everyone Should Know

 

One of the best ways to enjoy Ray Keating’s Pastor Stephen Grant thrillers and mysteries is to join the Pastor Stephen Grant Fellowship! For the BEST VALUE, consider the Book of the Month Club.  Check it all out at https://www.patreon.com/pastorstephengrantfellowship

 

Also, check out Ray’s podcasts – the Daily Dose of DisneyFree Enterprise in Three Minutes, and the PRESS CLUB C Podcast.

 

Check out Ray Keating’s Disney news and entertainment site at www.DisneyBizJournal.com.